Can Salt Therapy Help in Post-Workout Muscle Recovery?

If there is waste in the respiratory system, the oxygen will be delivered at a much slower rate, affecting the efficiency of your workout. This is where salt therapy can help. Dr. Joseph Marino explained that salt vapors in the air can reduce the thickness of mucus in your respiratory tracts. Mucus is known to clog nasal passages and sinuses which can affect your ability to breathe clearly. The more clogged those passages are, the more difficult it will be to supply oxygen to the muscles slowing down the recovery process.

Sleep and recovery

One other proven benefit of halotherapy is improved sleep. A contributor on Yoga Journal shared her husband’s experience with salt therapy and how it cured his sleep apnea. Browse through other testimonials and you’ll find that better sleep is a common benefit gained from salt therapy. 

Getting enough shut-eye is just as important as other rehab techniques and nutrition when it comes to recovery. While your mind and body are at rest, Everyday Health illustrated that it goes into recovery and repair mode. Working out causes microscopic tears in the muscles which need to be healed overnight in order to become stronger. If you deprive yourself of sleep, you’re essentially interrupting your body’s ability to fix itself, which can cause muscle soreness and even injury.

The method used in halotherapy was modernized from salt caves that existed back in the Grecian age. We now have salt therapy rooms, such as the ones in Salt Suite, where you can enjoy similar benefits. It is one of those methods that will continue to advance to meet with the growing need for alternative medicine. The last few decades have witnessed an increased interest in similar techniques that can reduce physical ailments or injuries related to exercise. Because of this, there will also be an ongoing demand for more professionals who can properly deliver these therapy methods. The demand for nurses in the next seven years will steadily increase, as Maryville University states that there will be a 15% rise in job openings between 2016 to 2026, and this includes sports medicine as the focus on health and wellness gets stronger. Athletes are no longer the only group to take working out and physical rehabilitation seriously. Hosts of fitness outlets have become more accessible to the average person. That is also why The Salt Suite continues to expand across Florida, New Jersey and other states to come.

Working out is important but staying injury free is just as valuable. For bigger workout gains, salt therapy might just do the trick.

 

 

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Submitted by Alexie Cole